Vocation Profile - Discalced Carmelite Nuns

Discalced Carmelite Nuns

Sr. Mercia Mary Bowie O.C.D.
Vocation Contact
7201 W 32nd St
Little Rock, AR 72204

501-565-5121
lrcarmel@comcast.net
www.littlerockcarmel.org

International?No
Professed members15
Year founded1950
Generalate/motherhouseAutonomous
Province/federationAutonomous

(Arch)dioceses
Little Rock, AR
Mission
The Order of the Blessed Virgin Mary is the first Order dedicated to the Mother of God. We draw our inspiration from the prophet Elijah. The Carmelite nuns live as desert hermits in communities that are small and family-like after the express wish of St. Teresa of Jesus, the 16th century reformer of Carmel. The structure of life is simple, with work, prayer and recreation. In our sisterly life together the nuns learn to follow Jesus, poor, chaste and obedient to the Father. The Carmelite nun makes prayer the center of her life. It is even her apostolate. After the example of St. Teresa, she gives an ecclesial orientation to her prayer and consecrated life. Enclosure, solitude and silence all create and atmosphere for this prayer life where one may listen to the voice of Christ and grow in union with Him. After the example of St. Therese of the Child Jesus and the Holy Face, we seek to fulfill our vocation to be "love in the heart of the Church" (cf. Story of a Soul).
Qualifications
A call to a life of prayer; some college study or work experience; good moral, physical and psychological health; ability to grow within the context of an enclosed life; and freedom from obligations to others (debts, dependents, etc.).
Formation
Up to three months' live-in experience; one year postulancy; two-year novitiate before making first (temporary) profession; three years of temporary profession; and then solemn profession.
Age range/limit
21-45
Belated vocations?
Yes: Exceptions considered.

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